Exuberance of Meaning: The Art Patronage of Catherine the Great (1762–1796)

Exuberance of Meaning: The Art Patronage of Catherine the Great (1762–1796)
"Exuberance of Meaning: The Art Patronage of Catherine the Great (1762–1796)," organized by Dr. Asen Kirin at the University of Georgia’s Lamar Dodd School of Art, is an exceptional exhibition for the Georgia Museum of Art. Not only are the objects on which it focuses remarkable achievements of European decorative arts, but the scholarship its accompanying catalogue contains adds immeasurably to the field. Kirin examines Catherine’s use of art patronage as a tool to solidify her grasp on power through her evocation of both the classical past and Byzantine heritage. In essays that focus in depth on the Orlov vase, the Buch chalice and the Green Frog Service, he takes a close look at the intricate symbolism each object evokes and the “exuberance of meaning” each was meant to convey. Scott Ruby, Liana Paredes, and Kristen Regina, of Hillwood Estate, Museum & Gardens, contribute essays and catalogue entries that further add to the body of knowledge on this singular and fascinating ruler. The catalogue stands as a record of the exhibition, with full-page color images of nearly every object it includes, but goes beyond that to serve as a resource for scholars and the general public.

Hardback: 232 pages
Publisher: Georgia Museum of Art; First edition (October 2013)

Stock number:

0386816

Price:

$50.00